English Listening World

× About me Podcast Blog login
☰ menu

Longest Rivers

2023-02-18 00:00:00 / episode: 32

0:00
0:00

Script

The longest rivers, the longest rivers in the world are pretty important for a number of reasons.

One of the first reasons that comes to mind is, well, rivers are a place where people can live easily.

In fact, the birthplace or the cradle of civilization is a river or two rivers.

That was over in Mesopotamia.

But those weren't the longest rivers.

The longest river in the world is the Nile and it gave birth to another civilization.

The Egyptians, the second longest river in the world is the amazon River and it's in the middle of a jungle.

So I guess there are some historical remains of a civilization, but it wasn't a long lasting civilization.

The Yangtze River over in Asia is the third longest river in the world, but it has the distinction of being

The longest river to run inside completely inside one country China.

So it's kind of the longest river in its own right.

We have to take care of our long rivers.

The more that we pollute those rivers,

the more effect they can have on the planet

and we don't want to pollute our planet because right now it seems like it's the only one.

Some people talk about going to mars that's another story, but I don't think it's a really good alternative.

We shouldn't just throw away earth.

So we have these long, long rivers and some of these rivers are so big

that we can't even see across the mouth of the river.

By the way, the mouth of the river is where the river flows into the ocean in some places,

the river breaks up so it doesn't have one mouth,

it has a delta, with 1000 small rivers running into the ocean.

But they're all that one river.

On the other hand, the amazon has one giant mouth and it's so big that you can't see across it.

So the mouth of the river is enormous and it's often changing the fourth longest river in the world, the Mississippi,

while the mouth of the river has been controlled so that it only flows in one direction.

But if it was less left to nature, it would be flipping and flopping and changing all the time.

And right now it's about to flop and the americans are trying to keep it in one spot.

That's another podcast story for another day.

But it's a big project for them.

What about your country? Do you have long rivers in your country?